Month: August 2017

Harbour Centre’s Vancouver Lookout is celebrating its 40th anniversary. As a part of its “coming of age”, Vancouver Heritage Foundation has partnered with the Lookout and invites you to experience different perspectives on the city through a new event series from this special vantage point. Perspectives: Talks & Discussions will explore stories – surprising, thought-provoking, and thrilling – that have shaped Vancouver over time.

Five talks from different speakers will offer insight on a range of topics including Indigenous stories and context, South Asian history and immigration, architectural development and change, Vancouver’s music scene and nightlife, and the city’s seedy criminal history.The mix of daytime and evening events runs September through November. Coffee will be provided at morning talks.

For more information, visit: vancouverlookout.com/blog or follow #VancouverPerspectives on social media.

Please plan to arrive at Harbour Centre at least 15 minutes before the posted start to allow time to take the elevator to the Lookout. Each talk will begin promptly 15 minutes after the posted start time.

Program Schedule

Blanketing the City: Musqueam Stories  
Saturday September 23
10:15-12:00pm
Debra Sparrow and Kamala Todd

The dominant stories of our city tend to be those of the colonial culture, which has written itself into the built form and the narratives of Vancouver. Musqueam artist Debra Sparrow’s people have lived here for thousands of years, her people’s history and relationships with this land are “written in the earth”. Metis-Cree filmmaker and community planner Kamala Todd holds deep gratitude for the Musqueam, Tsleil-Waututh and Squamish people, who so generously share their lands and wealth – while being in many ways written out of the story and landscapes of Vancouver. Join us for a dynamic conversation that weaves important Indigenous stories and asks how we can inhabit an urban past, present and future which fully reflects and embodies the Indigenous people of these lands.

Cultural Landscapes: Vancouver’s South Asian Community
Saturday October 7
9:45-11:30am
Naveen Girn, Paneet Singh and Milan Singh

In one of the earliest South Asian Canadian novels, Sadhu Singh Dhami wrote that sometimes the landscape of Vancouver can evoke the idea of home because “the Fraser was much like the Sutlej gliding through the plains of the Punjab.” This talk looks at how migrants over the past 100 years have worked to create belonging and thread their lives into the story of Vancouver. From the epic tale of the Komagata Maru to clandestine freedom movements, from the fight for civil rights to the living legacy of trauma and displacement, this talk will illuminate South Asian stories and intercultural relationships that can only happen in Vancouver.

Historic Crime: Early Forensic Investigations
Thursday October 19
6:15-8:00pm
Eve Lazarus

Join Author Eve Lazarus for a night of true crime as she draws on stories from her latest book Blood, Sweat, and Fear: The Story of Inspector Vance, Vancouver’s First Forensic Investigator. Starting in 1907 as the City Analyst for the City of Vancouver, John F.C.B. Vance worked in several buildings in downtown Vancouver before being named honorary inspector for the VPD and put in charge of the newly formed Police Bureau of Science (now housing the Vancouver Police Museum). Vance used his cutting-edge skills in serology, toxicology, firearms examination, trace evidence and autopsy to solve some of the most sensational crimes of the twentieth century. His techniques were so effective that there were seven attempts on his life, and for a time, he and his family were under constant police guard.

Heritage from Up High
Sunday October 29
9.45-11:30am
John Atkin

Join John Atkin, as he explores the constantly changing Vancouver landscape and tells the stories behind some of its most iconic buildings and neighbourhoods. Hear about the Woodward’s site including the story behind the store’s demolition, learn about gold rush money, renewal and restorations around the Flack Block, gaze down at the Morris J. Wosk centre as you hear its tale of demolition threats and eventual adaptive reuse as well as the complex history of Waterfront Station where modern uses have breathed new life into this venerable building.

Vancouver After Dark: History of the Entertainment Scene
Thursday November 16
6:15-8:00pm
Aaron Chapman

Downtown Vancouver was home to legendary nightclubs throughout much of the last century where, thanks to Vancouver’s geographic location, many performers would kick off tours. Today, most of the theatres of Granville Street are gone, and only a few legendary nightspots remain. How did some of Vancouver’s clubs remain, and others simply disappear? Is the city’s “Granville Entertainment District” really the answer? Author Aaron Chapman explores the history and future of Vancouver’s music scene.

Vancouver Heritage Foundation is a registered charity working to support the city’s built heritage through educational programming and awareness building. To find out more about VHF, visit vancouverheritagefoundation.org.

This event (November 16 only) will feature a cash bar from Vancouver’s first micro distillery, Long Table Distillery.

Buy Tickets

 

Vancouver’s worldwide reputation for diversity and inclusion becomes especially visible during the enormous Pride celebrations that occur at the end of July and first weekend of August.

This year will be the 39th annual Pride Parade and celebrations. The theme for 2017 is ‘My Pride,’ which according to the official Vancouver Pride Society website “[recognizes] that for each individual, Pride week can be a very unique personal experience with both celebratory and deeply emotional component.”

This year we have Vancouver’s very first all ages Pride dance! Prance on the Pier will start at 5pm on August 2nd in The Shipyards at 25 Wallace Mews in North Vancouver. There will be food, games, drag performances, and much more! This is an all ages, family friendly, and free event for folks who want to celebrate pride and dance the night away.

The West End is the home of Davie Street, where the gay and LGBTQ2+ subculture and community thrive. On the Friday before Pride weekend Davie Street is closed off from Burrard all the way to Jervais for the Davie Street Party. This year’s Davie Street Party is on August 4th from 6 pm until midnight; there will be vendors, performers, art installations, two stages, and the infamous Silent Disco. Davie Street is also home to many fantastic restaurants and businesses which will be open during Davie Street Party.

Photo By: Metro News

On August 5th the Terry Wallace Memorial Breakfast begins at 8 am.  It will be in the Jim Deva Plaza next to the famous rainbow crosswalks at Davie and Bute Street. It is a by donation community breakfast honouring one of the founders of pride in Vancouver. He is remembered as a warm and friendly individual who worked hard to keep the Pride Parade afloat in the beginning. Terry Wallace managed the old Castle Pub and he was the backbone of Pride parade during the 1980s and 90s. Wallace and fellow bar owner Garry Penny, along with board member for Pride Community Foundation Rob Atkinson, all managed to pull together the very first parade in less than 3 months.

And finally Pride week ends off with the famous Vancouver Pride Parade on August 6th. The parade starts at 12pm at Robson St. and Bute in Downtown Vancouver, proceeding west on Robson St. to Denman St., then south to Beach Ave., ending at Sunset Beach. Vancouver’s Pride Parade is known as one of the biggest in the world and reportedly has around half a million attendees every year. Last year the parade had special guest Prime Minister Justin Trudeau march alongside various community, independent, and corporate groups. It is 3 hours of rainbows and music, and where one can see the diversity of the LGBTQ2+ community and its allies.

While the parade is marching along there will be a large Pride Festival at Sunset beach.  There will be various food and merchandise vendors, a large stage with different performers and all sorts of fun activities.

Vancouver`s Pride Parade started as a protest against the oppression, discrimination, and marginalization of the LGBTQ2+ community in Vancouver. Vancouver is lucky to be able to celebrate its LGBTQ2+ community and have one of the largest Pride Parades in the world.

Amongst the glee, glitter, and gaiety there`s an important history still being made. It is important to remember that LGBTQ2+ folks are still being discriminated against for their various identities and Pride is an important part of recognizing the experiences of LGBTQ2+ folks. Pride celebrations are an important statement for declaring and celebrating the existence of LGBTQ2+ folks. Vancouver and Vancouverites are fortunate in being able to proudly fly the rainbow flag because many are unable to.

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